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I Want To Be In A Scary Story

by Sean Taylor

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Genre: Monster, Funny, Picture Book

Type of reader:

Age range: 6 years

Length of book:

Series:

Reviewed by: Katy Reeve

Author: Sean Taylor

This book is an excellent choice if your child;

  • Loves a funny story, where they can join in and shout-along.

  • LIkes characters who ask questions.

  • Can empathise with characters who like adventure or feel fear.

  • Wants to know how it feels to wish for something then regret it.

  • Has enjoyed Meg and Mog, Winnie the Witch or Funny Bones.

I loved this warm-hearted, hilarious and scary picture book. The cute, gappy mouthed main character “Little Monster’, is endearing and relatable. He converses with the narrator throughout, which, with the use of ‘jeepers creepers’, 'yikes' and 'crikes' and 'golly gosh', encourages children to join in as well as set the tone. The illustrations, language and themes hark back to the 70s.

 

However, it feels more sophisticated. The dark pictures create an atmospheric mood that reminded me of the childhood classic, Meg and Mog.

 

The characters all come together to help Little Monster overcome his fear, children will have plenty of empathy for him and may either want to talk about their worries or how they have scared others themselves. I think both sides can be talked about through the book to help children make sense of how it feels and the impact their actions can have on others.

 

Review

The Washington Post

"It’s a hoot, and Jean Jullien’s big-brush illustrations are as cute as a basket of werewolf cubs. Long before school forces them to learn a bunch of dead literary terms, you’ll be teaching your little fiends about tone, dramatic irony and narrative structure. But don’t mention any of that on Halloween. Nothing drives a stake through the heart of a great book like turning it into a lesson. Just read it — and howl together.”

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert…

 

What questions did your children ask when reading? Did they feel sorry for Little Monster? I would love to hear.